Exodus

Exodus

Venice

Venice, as a lived-in city, is dying. A population which peaked at 164,000 in 1931 is now hovering at around 60,000. Since about 20 million tourists pour in each year - 55,000 a day - it's a safe bet that most days there are now more tourists than locals in Venice. When the February carnival tradition was revived in the 1970s, in the hope of attracting tourists in greater numbers, many locals thought of it as a last hurrah for the old city. Former Venetians now living in Mestre still recall the 70s carnivals as a kind of collective goodbye party.

Who now can stop the slow death of Venice? - Tom Kington, The Observer, Sunday 1. March 2009

Photo by Denis Daničić Copyright 2010

EXIF

Focal Length: 70 mm
Exposure: 1/8000 sec
Aperture: f 3.2
ISO: 800

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Exodus

Exodus

Venice

Venice, as a lived-in city, is dying. A population which peaked at 164,000 in 1931 is now hovering at around 60,000. Since about 20 million tourists pour in each year - 55,000 a day - it's a safe bet that most days there are now more tourists than locals in Venice. When the February carnival tradition was revived in the 1970s, in the hope of attracting tourists in greater numbers, many locals thought of it as a last hurrah for the old city. Former Venetians now living in Mestre still recall the 70s carnivals as a kind of collective goodbye party.

Who now can stop the slow death of Venice? - Tom Kington, The Observer, Sunday 1. March 2009

Photo by Denis Daničić Copyright 2010

EXIF

Focal Length: 70 mm
Exposure: 1/8000 sec
Aperture: f 3.2
ISO: 800

Latest Comment

  • No Comments Yet.
Add Comment   View All (0)